gentlemaninkhaki
gentlemaninkhaki:

A Battalion Private Corporal of the South Fencibles, c. 1780
Watermark and all, this is probably one of my favorite images of a British Soldier during the period of the American Revolution.
A divergence with the regulars’ regulation uniform is what appears to be a fringed epaulette worn on this fencible’s right shoulder. Though obscured by his firelock, there may very well be a matching one on his left. In the regular army, corporals wore a single silk epaulette on the right shoulder.

Mistake! This is actually a corporal, despite what the inscription on the frame says-

Detail, Corporal, Battalion Company, South Fencibles

Infantry Corporal, Henry William Bunbury
Thanks to the 18th Century Material Culture Research Center.

gentlemaninkhaki:

A Battalion Private Corporal of the South Fencibles, c. 1780

Watermark and all, this is probably one of my favorite images of a British Soldier during the period of the American Revolution.

A divergence with the regulars’ regulation uniform is what appears to be a fringed epaulette worn on this fencible’s right shoulder. Though obscured by his firelock, there may very well be a matching one on his left. In the regular army, corporals wore a single silk epaulette on the right shoulder.

Mistake! This is actually a corporal, despite what the inscription on the frame says-

Detail, Corporal, Battalion Company, South Fencibles

Infantry Corporal, Henry William Bunbury

Thanks to the 18th Century Material Culture Research Center.

Irish Artillery, c. 1779 (?), watercolor by E. Fitzgerald. 
The date on this one is entirely a guess based on the style of uniform. ASKB dates it from 1756-1768, though this strikes me as unlikely. This soldier on the Irish establishment wears a blue coat with somewhat abbreviated skirts, black spatterdashes with a white cartouche pouch (with a harp badge!). His hat is cocked high in the back, and low in the front- In a style known as a Denmark Cock (source- The Dictionary of Fashion History, 65), worn on hair powdered and done in a very long cue, reaching almost to the small of his back. Lapel buttons spaced doubly, gold buttons, same with the worked buttonholes, epaulettes and cavalry-style chevrons worn on the sleeves. 

Irish Artillery, c. 1779 (?), watercolor by E. Fitzgerald.

The date on this one is entirely a guess based on the style of uniform. ASKB dates it from 1756-1768, though this strikes me as unlikely. This soldier on the Irish establishment wears a blue coat with somewhat abbreviated skirts, black spatterdashes with a white cartouche pouch (with a harp badge!). His hat is cocked high in the back, and low in the front- In a style known as a Denmark Cock (source- The Dictionary of Fashion History, 65), worn on hair powdered and done in a very long cue, reaching almost to the small of his back. Lapel buttons spaced doubly, gold buttons, same with the worked buttonholes, epaulettes and cavalry-style chevrons worn on the sleeves.