Tambours Ruse et Anglais by Carle Vernet, 1815.
The Drummer wears the distinctive red-faced blue of a Royal Regiment. “The Coats for Drummers and Fifers of the Guards and all Royal Regiments or Royal Corps of Infantry serving in Europe, N. America are to be of Red Cloth similar in Quality and Colour as for the Rank and File… The Cuffs, Collar, Wings, and Shoulder-Straps for the Guards and all Royal Regiments or Corps to be of Dark Blue cloth… The … Lace on the Coats for the Drummers… of all Royal Regiments or Royal Corps comes under the Denomination of Royal lace, and consists of Blue and White, or Blue and White and Yellow Worsted, considerably raised above the common Lace.” 1802 Regulations, quoted in Rene Chartrand, A Scarlet Coat.

Tambours Ruse et Anglais by Carle Vernet, 1815.

The Drummer wears the distinctive red-faced blue of a Royal Regiment. “The Coats for Drummers and Fifers of the Guards and all Royal Regiments or Royal Corps of Infantry serving in Europe, N. America are to be of Red Cloth similar in Quality and Colour as for the Rank and File… The Cuffs, Collar, Wings, and Shoulder-Straps for the Guards and all Royal Regiments or Corps to be of Dark Blue cloth… The … Lace on the Coats for the Drummers… of all Royal Regiments or Royal Corps comes under the Denomination of Royal lace, and consists of Blue and White, or Blue and White and Yellow Worsted, considerably raised above the common Lace.” 1802 Regulations, quoted in Rene Chartrand, A Scarlet Coat.

minutemanworld

minutemanworld:

bantarleton:

Major Patrick Campbell by an anonymous artist. 

That’s a remarkably plain uniform for an officer. I wonder if he made a deliberate decision to get his portrait done with his campaign uniform? I notice he has a fusil in addition to his sword, so maybe? Though he is wearing his gorget, so maybe not?

Writing in The Military Medley, Thomas Simes included two frock-suits within his List of Things necessary for a young Gentleman to be furnished with upon obtaining his first Comission in the Infantry. There is no description of what differentiated a frock suit from a suit of clothes. He earlier stated that frocks, worn with boots, sashes, gorgets, and queued hair, should be worn during bi-weekly regimental field days.

Several portraits exist showing officers in unlaced frocks-

Captain George K. H. Coussmaker, 1st Regt. of Foot Guards by Joshue Reynolds, 1782

Lieutenant and Captain Thomas Dowdeswell, 1st Guards, c. 1778

On Officer of the 4th Regt. of Foot by Thomas Gainsborough, ca. 1776-80

More info on Frocks- http://www.livinghistoryworldwide.com/group/soldiersofgeorgeiii17601820/forum/topics/2040198:Topic:61786

Other rank’s coat, 1st Foot Guards, c. 1773. Surviving uniforms from the 18th century are rare, and those of ordinary soldiers are even rarer. This is one of two identical uniform coats, held in the National Army Museum and the Snowshill Wade Costume Collection, the circumstances of whose creation and the reason for their preservation are unknown.

Other rank’s coat, 1st Foot Guards, c. 1773. Surviving uniforms from the 18th century are rare, and those of ordinary soldiers are even rarer. This is one of two identical uniform coats, held in the National Army Museum and the Snowshill Wade Costume Collection, the circumstances of whose creation and the reason for their preservation are unknown.

lesleyannemcleod

teambingley:

 “dandy chargers” (early nineteenth-century proto-bicycles propelled forward with the feet). Most of these caricatures seem to associate reckless biking with spoiled, foppish young men — interesting, then, that the last one shows an effeminate dandy getting smoked by what appears to be a naval officer:

"The Dandy Charger’s all the go,
Ten Knots an hour, Yeo, heave, ho
I scud along on this Machine,
While gaping crowds are laughing seen,
And every Dandy that I pass
I’ll leave sprawling on his A—!”

The first three caricatures are William Heath’s doing; not sure about the last one. Images courtesy of the British Museum’s online archive.

jaded-mandarin
redcoatlady:

"Marquess of Granby relieving a sick soldier" by Edward Penny, 1765, detail.

Note- The gaiters are very closely fitted. They need to be- They’re what’s keeping rocks and dirt out of your shoes on the march. Loose-fitting gaiters (heck, loose-fitting 2nd Half of the18th C. anything) in films, reenactments, contemporary art, &c. are a particular pet peeve of mine.

redcoatlady:

"Marquess of Granby relieving a sick soldier" by Edward Penny, 1765, detail.

Note- The gaiters are very closely fitted. They need to be- They’re what’s keeping rocks and dirt out of your shoes on the march. Loose-fitting gaiters (heck, loose-fitting 2nd Half of the18th C. anything) in films, reenactments, contemporary art, &c. are a particular pet peeve of mine.

"A March to the Bank," as observed by James Gillray, 1787. 
Following an attack on the premises during the 1780 Gordon Riots (provoked by the rabidly anti-Catholic, and possibly insane, Lord George Gordon), the Foot Guards posted a nightly picquet-Guard, a body a troops kept in readiness in case of alarm, on the Bank of England. The guard marched along the pavement, apparently with little regard for other pedestrians, high or low. The Lord Mayor of London was once amongst those unlucky enough to be pushed into the gutter.
Source: Julian Paget, The Story of the Guards (Oxford: Osprey, 1976)

"A March to the Bank," as observed by James Gillray, 1787.

Following an attack on the premises during the 1780 Gordon Riots (provoked by the rabidly anti-Catholic, and possibly insane, Lord George Gordon), the Foot Guards posted a nightly picquet-Guard, a body a troops kept in readiness in case of alarm, on the Bank of England. The guard marched along the pavement, apparently with little regard for other pedestrians, high or low. The Lord Mayor of London was once amongst those unlucky enough to be pushed into the gutter.

Source: Julian Paget, The Story of the Guards (Oxford: Osprey, 1976)