Prussia: Officer, Regiment Prinz von Oranien, 1806.
The waist of this fellow’s breeches has advanced from its natural positions, and now reaches about mid-torso. Here’s a relevant comparison of breeches from 1795 and 1805 respectively (via warof1812.ca). The full article is also worth a read. 
Such are the vagaries of early 19th century Military fashion.

Prussia: Officer, Regiment Prinz von Oranien, 1806.

The waist of this fellow’s breeches has advanced from its natural positions, and now reaches about mid-torso. Here’s a relevant comparison of breeches from 1795 and 1805 respectively (via warof1812.ca). The full article is also worth a read.

Such are the vagaries of early 19th century Military fashion.

Non-Commissioned Officers of the Life Guards, 1882. 
All wear sergeants’ chevrons on their right arms. The four from the left wear the Egyptian campaign ribbon on their upper breast. The rightmost Sergeant wears both the ‘Egypt’ ribbon, and another. This is certainly not another campaign ribbon, seeing as the Egyptian Campaign was the first active service in which the Horse Guards participated since Waterloo. My guess would be the Meritorious Service ribbon, but its too obscure to make out, and I’m far from an expert in in Military decorations.

Non-Commissioned Officers of the Life Guards, 1882.

All wear sergeants’ chevrons on their right arms. The four from the left wear the Egyptian campaign ribbon on their upper breast. The rightmost Sergeant wears both the ‘Egypt’ ribbon, and another. This is certainly not another campaign ribbon, seeing as the Egyptian Campaign was the first active service in which the Horse Guards participated since Waterloo. My guess would be the Meritorious Service ribbon, but its too obscure to make out, and I’m far from an expert in in Military decorations.

Five Troopers of the Life Guards who served in Egypt, 1882. From left to right: J Usher, W S Perry, E Bailey, W Richardson and H Lafferty. All wear stable dress consisting of jackets, foraging caps, and trousers.
Four of the troopers wear good conduct stripes on their left forearm- Three with one chevron, indicating two years good conduct, the rightmost soldier wears three, indicating an impressive record of twelve years service. The two lefthand troopers wear Swordsmanship badges, consisting of two crossed sabres, above their service stripes. All wear the 1882 Egyptian Campaign ribbon on their left breast.

Five Troopers of the Life Guards who served in Egypt, 1882. From left to right: J Usher, W S Perry, E Bailey, W Richardson and H Lafferty. All wear stable dress consisting of jackets, foraging caps, and trousers.

Four of the troopers wear good conduct stripes on their left forearm- Three with one chevron, indicating two years good conduct, the rightmost soldier wears three, indicating an impressive record of twelve years service. The two lefthand troopers wear Swordsmanship badges, consisting of two crossed sabres, above their service stripes. All wear the 1882 Egyptian Campaign ribbon on their left breast.