"Extraordinary scene on the road from London to Portsmouth, or an instance of unexpected speed, used by a body of guards," print after Rowlandson, 1798.
Though infantry, since time immemorial, had gotten where they needed to be by marching there, an novel experiment occurred in 1798. In response to the urgent need for troops to deal with the Irish rebellion, the first battalions of the Coldstream Guards and the 3rd Guards (1920 rank and file) were conveyed in wheeled transports from London to Portsmouth. Apparently, this proved enough of comic sight for Mr. Rowlandson, who dutifully caricatured the whole affair.

"Extraordinary scene on the road from London to Portsmouth, or an instance of unexpected speed, used by a body of guards," print after Rowlandson, 1798.

Though infantry, since time immemorial, had gotten where they needed to be by marching there, an novel experiment occurred in 1798. In response to the urgent need for troops to deal with the Irish rebellion, the first battalions of the Coldstream Guards and the 3rd Guards (1920 rank and file) were conveyed in wheeled transports from London to Portsmouth. Apparently, this proved enough of comic sight for Mr. Rowlandson, who dutifully caricatured the whole affair.

humanoidhistory
humanoidhistory:

gentlemaninkhaki:

British soldiers of the 7 Years War, from Stanley Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon (Warner Brothers, 1975).

I can’t say enough about how much I love this movie. It’s so rich and deep and witty, enough to bring me back for at least 4 TV viewings and one big-screen encounter, not to mention two visits to the Kubrick exhibit at the LA County Museum of Art. Some might find it slow-going at times, but I say humbug to that. It’s got epic battles, multiple duels (both pistol and sword!), espionage, highway robbery, gambling, brilliant music, plus loads of ribaldry and seduction — all in the voice of Thackeray filtered through the mind of Kubrick. Heartily recommended by this humble reblogger.

Absolutely agreed! Barry Lyndon is one of the few movies which so vividly recreates period atmosphere through staging, lighting, and music. (alright, Schubert’s a little anachronistic- But it’s evocative, darn it!) Kubrick wanted the film to be as close to life as possible, which he achieved, and then some!

humanoidhistory:

gentlemaninkhaki:

British soldiers of the 7 Years War, from Stanley Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon (Warner Brothers, 1975).

I can’t say enough about how much I love this movie. It’s so rich and deep and witty, enough to bring me back for at least 4 TV viewings and one big-screen encounter, not to mention two visits to the Kubrick exhibit at the LA County Museum of Art. Some might find it slow-going at times, but I say humbug to that. It’s got epic battles, multiple duels (both pistol and sword!), espionage, highway robbery, gambling, brilliant music, plus loads of ribaldry and seduction — all in the voice of Thackeray filtered through the mind of Kubrick. Heartily recommended by this humble reblogger.

Absolutely agreed! Barry Lyndon is one of the few movies which so vividly recreates period atmosphere through staging, lighting, and music. (alright, Schubert’s a little anachronistic- But it’s evocative, darn it!) Kubrick wanted the film to be as close to life as possible, which he achieved, and then some!